Tinnitus Awareness Week

Tinnitus Awareness Week is observed throughout the world in the first full week of February and the purpose of it is to educate the public about the symptoms of tinnitus and how it affects people.

Tinnitus is the perception of noise or ringing in the ear and 20 percent of people experience it. It’s not actually a condition, but a symptom of underlying conditions. These can be age-related, related to hearing loss, ear injury, or a circulatory system disorder. The symptoms include ringing, buzzing, clicking, roaring, hissing, or humming in the ear and it varies depending on the person

Tinnitus research has begun closing in on a tinnitus cure, but so far, no one tinnitus treatment works for everyone.

In many cases, tinnitus goes away on its own. However, that doesn’t mean you should wait for weeks, months, or even years for your tinnitus to disappear. If your tinnitus continues for more than a couple of weeks and negatively affects your quality of life, consult an audiologist.

Why is Tinnitus Awareness important?

It’s under-researched

There are many advancements being made, but tinnitus is still under-researched. Surgical implants and alternative medicines could help, but without the proper research, it won’t be as effective as it should be.

Fight against the stigma

Many people are embarrassed to admit that they have tinnitus. It’s such a personal and seemingly subjective concern that talking about it makes some feel silly and it shouldn’t. It should be discussed with healthcare professionals if it affects your way of life. The embarrassment needs to end.

It affects so many

Tinnitus affects millions of people and that should be brought up more, not hidden away and forgotten about. Because they’re symptoms and not conditions themselves, it’s easier to brush it off, but the condition could be worse, and getting it checked out could prolong your life.

For professionals who support people with hearing and tinnitus issues

Treating tinnitus patients can be challenging. Tinnitus Management tools help you assess the impact of tinnitus on your patients and offer strategies for coping with it. The tools guide you in relaying hope and delivering support. Visit the Ida Institute